Tine Haubner studied sociology, philosophy and psychology and is a post-doctoral research associate at the Sociological Institute of the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena/Germany. Her research focuses mainly on the intersection of work, welfare state and social inequality combining qualitative research with sociological theory. She completed her Ph.D. on informal work and exploitation in elder care between 2013 and 2016 and has received several awards for this work. From 2017 to 2020, she led a research project on civic engagement in Germany. Currently, she is leading a four-year research project on rural poverty and informal economies in Germany. In this context, she is spending a six-month re-search stay at the Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education at Penn State University.

“Two-Class Societies in the Countryside: Rural Poverty Areas between Upgrading and Peripherization in Germany”

“Two-Class Societies in the Countryside: Rural Poverty Areas between Upgrading and Peripherization in Germany”

  • M.E. John Seminar
  • 2021-12-03T14:30:00-05:00
  • 2021-12-03T15:30:00-05:00
  • Tine Haubner studied sociology, philosophy and psychology and is a post-doctoral research associate at the Sociological Institute of the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena/Germany. Her research focuses mainly on the intersection of work, welfare state and social inequality combining qualitative research with sociological theory. She completed her Ph.D. on informal work and exploitation in elder care between 2013 and 2016 and has received several awards for this work. From 2017 to 2020, she led a research project on civic engagement in Germany. Currently, she is leading a four-year research project on rural poverty and informal economies in Germany. In this context, she is spending a six-month re-search stay at the Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education at Penn State University.

When December 3, 2021, 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Contact Leslie Martin

Contact Phone 814-865-5461

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In Germany, structurally weak rural areas are considered crisis locations par excellence: a lack of infrastructure has left many villages socially desolate, the population is aging and becoming disconnected. On the other hand, rural areas are experiencing a renaissance as a refuge for stress ridden city dwellers and are seen as a testing ground for civic self-determination. The growing attention paid to rural areas by academia, politics and the media as a result of these tense developments nevertheless reveals blind spots. One such blind spot is the phenomenon of rural poverty, which has not received sufficient attention in German-speaking rural sociology, poverty research or politics. The lecture is dedicated to the phenomenon of rural poverty and socio-spatial peripheralization processes in the context of economically, politically, socially and demographically caused devaluation processes on the one hand and local upgrading strategies on the other. The basis is provided by a qualitative-empirical research project launched in 2020 and led by Tine Haubner, in which poverty in four rural poverty areas in eastern and western Germany is being investigated. The findings show that rural poverty is also a result of peripheralization processes, which are rein-forced by one-sided local political upgrading strategies and have a clear class character. Rural poverty areas are thus also (locally) politically generated and are characterized by socio-structural division processes that contribute to the consolidation of social inequalities.