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Appendix 4: Additional Ideas for Intergenerational Nutrition-Related Activities

Family Meal Conversations:

  • Winning Conversation Cards: This is a resource from the University of Wyoming to promote conversations during Family Mealtime. The Winning Conversation Cards are from “WIN the Family,” “Wellness IN the Rockies” — www.uwyo.edu/wintherockies

For a copy of the cards, go to:http://crhreweb.uwyo.edu/WinTheRockies/Family%20Mealtimes/Meal%20Time/Winning%20Conversations%20Cards.pdf

Cooking Together:

Shopping Together:

  • Consider organizing an actual food shopping “field trip.”
  • Field activities such as scavenger hunts can be designed to deliver select food and nutrition content lessons.

Using Technology to Learn Together:

  • Family members can work together to create nutrition trivia quizzes for other families.
  • Work together to explore and use websites to help count calories and help make healthy food choices.

Farm-to-Table Activities:

  • If the nutrition education program is conducted at a site that has access to fresh fruits and vegetables, here are some ways to draw attention to the virtues of fresh fruits and vegetables:
  • Conduct taste tests to see is families can distinguish between freshly grown local produce versus older, perhaps pre-packaged produce.
  • Include local produce items in snacks offered during program sessions.

Food Appreciation:

  • Taste testing (blindfolded) — can be done as a fun and friendly competition.
    • Farm fresh vs. non-farm fresh fruits and vegetables
    • Whole milk vs. low fat milk
    • Distinguishing between multi-flavored jelly beans
    • Other: (Use your imagination)

Learning about MyPlate 
(USDA’s Food Guidance System)

  • Working alone or in small or large groups, participants can list and color in food that fit into each of the 5 segments of the MyPlate Coloring sheet (see Appendix 7).
  • Discuss the 5 basic food groups, relative portions, etc.