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Highlights from Global Action on Aging Newsletters

Posted: March 14, 2011

Topics include: 5 Questions to Ask Your Mother or Grandmother, Smart Ways to Care for Caregivers, Gray, Green, and Active: Environmental Volunteerism Benefits Older Adults and Society, and Vacation Groups That Span Three Generations Are Growing.

5 Questions to Ask Your Mother or Grandmother

(October 1, 2010)

Considering the gender gaps in old age, such as life expectancy and retirement income, researchers at The Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement (WISER) (in Washington DC) suggest some critical questions to ask our mothers and/or grandmothers as they approach retirement or organize their financial and health plans. Asking these questions and listening to the answers can be a key to the quality of retirement that your loved one experiences. ARTICLE

Smart Ways to Care for Caregivers

(November 15, 2010)

In the United States, about 65 million people are taking care of elderly family members and they are feeling great pressure. How to care for caregivers? This article provides suggestions to caregivers to manage their health and stress levels. It also reminds caregivers to talk about long-term care issues with the elderly before they become physically or mentally incapacitated. ARTICLE

Gray, Green, and Active: Environmental Volunteerism Benefits Older Adults and Society

(January 12, 2011)

Older people need to get involved in environmental volunteerism. Researcher Karl Pillemer (Hazel E. Reed Professor in the Department of Human Development and Professor of Gerontology in Medicine at the Weill Cornell Medical College) revealed that environmental volunteerism benefits individuals both from a health and social point of view. By engaging in an outdoor physical activity and meeting people from all ages, older persons can volunteer and preserve natural resources. ARTICLE

Vacation Groups That Span Three Generations Are Growing

(March 3, 2011)

Seeing an emerging trend, travel agents are increasingly targeting multigenerational families. Nowadays grandparents more often go on vacation with their children and grandchildren than did past generations. In 2010, 32% of grandparents who went on vacation took their grandchildren with them; in 2007 there only were 22%. Travel companies now develop new concepts of holidays with activities for all ages. ARTICLE