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Articles from the Global Action on Aging Newsletter

Posted: December 15, 2011

Includes: Report on The Challenges of Family Caregiving, US: Stressed Elder Caregivers in Need of Solutions; BeClose Seeks to Relieve “Stress in America,” Hitting Caregivers Harder Than Ever, and World: Going to Physician Visits with Older Loved Ones Could Improve Care

Report: The Challenges of Family Caregiving

December 12, 2011
This report was written by Susan C. Reinhard, Lynn Feinberg, and Rita Choula of the AARP Public Policy Institute. It provides an overview of ten common themes from authors who want to reach family caregivers. They think that policy makers and health care professionals need to understand their needs and challenges. Since the authors illustrate the worrying state of the current costly and fragmented health care system, the report calls on policymakers to prioritize caregiving on the public agenda.

US: Stressed Elder Caregivers in Need of Solutions; BeClose Seeks to Relieve “Stress in America,” Hitting Caregivers Harder Than Ever

January 30, 2012
Caregivers are increasingly struggling with the burden of caring for their aging or chronically ill relatives. However, some practical innovations can ease this responsibility. BeClose is wireless technology that provides caregivers with remote at-home monitoring of aging adults. It uses discreet wireless sensors placed in the home to track seniors' daily routine. The caregivers can check on them by using a private, secure web page and are also alerted in real time by phone, email or text message if there are any difficulties.

Editors note: As part of the broader discussion about the role of technology (and values!) in providing care for frail older adults, I wrote a short press piece in 2004, entitled: Wired for What? Technological Innovation and the Way We Care for Frail Older Adults.

World: Going to Physician Visits with Older Loved Ones Could Improve Care

January 23, 2011
According to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, family companions who regularly go with older adults on their physician office visits experience improved quality of health care. More communication and education among the provider, the patient and companion contribute to positive progress in the treatment process.